Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 2/26/2019

When you own a condominium, even if you’re entrance is street level, you're not really in charge of the common area or the building's exterior. All the entries look alike, and some even enter from hallways. So, how do you differentiate your home from the four or five others that are for sale in your complex?

Try these simple steps to give your place the edge:

  • Mind the door. While you may not be able to paint your condominium door a bright, trendy color, you can take a few moments to make sure it is clean and free from scuffs and finger marks. Use a whisk broom to brush off all dust, debris, and detritus that collects in the grooves and trim. If the door is wood, use a mild solution of a wood-safe soap to wash down the door, inside and out. Then, shine the door up with furniture polish so that it glows. If the door is metal or painted, use a gentle mixture of dish soap and water to remove grease and grime.
  • Make it shine. Clean any glass in the door or sidelights with a vinegar and water solution or an appropriate glass cleaner. Use a metal cleaner on the door handle, deadbolts, and any metal trim, including the trim around the peephole, and shine up the fisheye lens too.
  • Don’t forget the threshold. With a clean door, you’re already ahead of the game, but take a moment to sweep off the threshold (the wood or metal strip below the door), and all around the edges of the stoop or entry. Even when your doorway is in an interior hallway, the regular building cleaners may not get that extra dust and leftover dirt in the corners. Use your vacuum cleaner to suck away the last crumbs.
  • Be welcoming. Set a fresh new welcome mat in front of your door and add a flower pot of bright blooms if you’re allowed. For interior doors, a tasteful wreath or swag on the door highlights your entry. Be careful to avoid going “over-the-top” though. Simple and elegant is best.
  • Clear the entry. Your real control of the "appeal" starts once the door opens. Keep the entryway as open and uncluttered as possible. Move furniture away from the entry area to give it a more expansive feel. Keep décor simple, warm, and inviting. Avoid anything the potential buyer might bump into upon entering as that tends to leave the impression of small and crowded. 
  • Lighten things up. Put the best possible light on the subject. Take time to upgrade the bulbs in your entry lights (inside and out) to “daylight” LEDs for a friendly, well-lit glow.

A warm, inviting entrance sets the tone for the rest of the home, so give yours the edge it deserves.




Tags: Condo   curb appeal   tips  
Categories: tips   Condo Living   curb appeal  


Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 1/10/2019

Called “common-interest housing” condos, co-ops, flats, townhomes, and apartments have different meanings to different buyers and even have different colloquial meanings than the official real estate industry meanings. Below you'll find a breakdown of the differences between these housing types along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. 

What is “Common Interest Housing”?

Before going too deep, it is essential to understand just what "common-interest housing" actually is. This type of real estate involves a combination of individually owned areas and shared areas in a single property. Shared areas often include pools, parking, and clubhouses, but it can also mean shared landscaping, exteriors, fences and roofs depending on the type of property. A property manager, homeowners association (HOA) or a combination of the two maintains common areas.

Condos and Co-Ops

Condominiums, more commonly called condos, are single home units in a shared property. A homeowner separately owns each unit. The shared property types range from high rise buildings, also called apartments or flats, to conjoined homes townhouse-style. A single family home in a planned community or a mobile home in a community or park can also be condos. Instead of a specific type of home style, "condominium" is a legal term in the United States that refers to the ownership status, so homes of any form, connected or not, can qualify if they are part of a shared property community. 

A co-op, short for cooperative housing development, is another thing entirely. While similarly structured with private and shared areas, co-op owners purchase and own shares in the real estate development instead of their specific portion of the property. All the shareholders have a voice in the real estate corporation, and their investment includes the right to live in a unit. Usually, the monthly expenses of the real estate corporation split between shareholders, so this can be an extra expense you need to plan for. Similarly to condominium, "co-op" is a legal term that refers to the ownership style of the building or neighborhood instead of the building's structure. Depending on your area, you can find co-ops in apartment-style buildings, single family home neighborhoods and townhome style shared wall housing. 

Flats, Townhomes, and Apartments

You’ve noticed the words flat, apartment and townhome in the descriptions of condos and co-ops above. This is because apartments, flats, and townhomes don't have such specific legal meanings. The term "apartment" most often refers to rental units, usually in a single building or set of structures. These are generally not owned, but instead leased or rented from the owner of the entire building or complex. However, since apartments are just a building style with several units that have shared walkways and entryways, apartments can be rentals, condos or co-ops depending on the situation. 

Townhomes refer to a specific building style where the house connects to another house on at least one side. Just like apartments, townhomes could be rentals, co-ops, condos or single-family homes. The true townhome design requires both homes to have separate side-walls even though they touch. However, a lot of condo, co-op and apartment designs look like townhomes without actually meeting the construction requirements. Do this by styling the front or backs of each unit differently, even if constructed as part of a single building. 

Are you thinking of buying a condominium or co-op? Talk to your real estate agent about what's available in your area!




Categories: Real estate   Condo   Condo Living  


Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 11/27/2018

Looking to sell your condo? You're in luck, as there is high demand for condos across the United States.

As a condo seller, it is important to allocate the necessary time and resources to find ways to maximize the value of your property. By doing so, you'll be able to evaluate your condo, understand its strengths and weaknesses and take the right steps to enhance your property's appearance.

Moreover, there are several factors that you should consider before you add your condo to the housing market, including:

1. Your Condo's Condition

How will property buyers feel when they see your condo for the first time? Ultimately, you'll want your condo to make a positive first impression on homebuyers. To accomplish this goal, you may need to complete assorted home improvement tasks to enhance your condo both inside and out.

A property appraisal may prove to be exceedingly valuable, as this assessment will allow you to learn about your condo's condition. During the evaluation, a home appraiser will take a close look around your condo and offer honest, unbiased recommendations that you can use to improve your residence.

2. Your Timeline

You know that you want to sell your condo, but how quickly would you like to relocate to a new address? Understand your condo selling timeline, and you'll be able to plan accordingly.

For a condo seller who wants to move as soon as possible, establishing a competitive price from the get-go is essential. This price will help your condo stand out from other properties that are available and increase your chances of a quick condo sale.

3. Condo Rules and Regulations

If you plan to sell your condo, it is always better to err on the side of caution. Therefore, you should check with your homeowners' association (HOA) to see if there are any rules or requirements that must be followed when you sell your property.

For example, some condo communities may require HOA board approval for a new property owner. Or, if you live in a gated condo community, you should find out whether permission is needed to host an open house to showcase your property to a broad range of property buyers.

Selling a condo may seem like a complex process, particularly for those who are listing a property for the first time. Lucky for you, real estate agents are available to help you get the best results.

Employing a real estate agent with condo selling experience is paramount. With this real estate agent at your side, you should have no trouble optimizing the value of your condo.

Typically, a real estate agent will set up condo showings, negotiate with property buyers on your behalf. This real estate professional also will respond to your condo selling concerns and queries, ensuring you can make informed property selling decisions.

Don't leave anything to chance when you sell your condo. Collaborate with a real estate agent, and you can boost your chances of a seamless property sale.





Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 10/31/2017

Buying a condo represents a life-changing investment. As such, you'll want to allocate the necessary time and resources to ensure that purchasing a condo is right for you.

So what does it take to determine whether to purchase a condo? Here are three tips for those who are evaluating the pros and cons of buying a condo.

1. Understand What Condo Life Is All About

A condo and a house are two very different types of properties. Thus, you'll want to understand what condo life is all about before you purchase a condo.

For example, homeowners likely will have a front yard and backyard that they will need to maintain year-round. Homeowners also can plant a garden, install an in-ground pool and perform various home maintenance and upgrade projects at any time.

On the other hand, condo owners frequently live in closer proximity to one another in comparison to homeowners. This means condo owners likely won't have to mow their own lawns or shovel their walkways in winter. However, condo owners might lack the space to set up a personal garden, and they may require homeowners association (HOA) approval to complete any home exterior modifications as well.

2. Know the HOA Fees

Although you'll pay a mortgage as part of a condo purchase, you will still need to consider the HOA fees in addition to your monthly mortgage costs.

HOA fees cover the costs of insurance, maintenance and other property expenses. Plus, if your condo's roof is severely damaged or destroyed, you should be covered thanks to your HOA fees.

To learn about your HOA fees, you can contact the HOA directly. Also, your real estate agent will be able to provide insights into the HOA fees associated with a condo.

3. Collaborate with an Experienced Real Estate Agent

When it comes to purchasing a condo, all real estate agents are not created equal.

Finding a real estate agent who possesses many years of experience with condos is paramount. This real estate agent will be able to help you understand the ins and outs of condo life, examine HOA fees closely and discover whether a condo purchase is right for you.

Furthermore, your real estate agent should be able to help you along each stage of the homebuying journey. He or she will be able to set up condo showings, assess condos that match your price range and provide expert homebuying tips as you move along the homebuying journey.

Perhaps best of all, your real estate agent understands that the process of buying a condo can be challenging. As a result, your real estate agent is happy to respond to your concerns and queries. That way, if you're uncertain about purchasing a condo, you can consult with your real estate agent and get the best support possible.

Hire a real estate agent with condo experience – you'll be glad you did. With this real estate professional at your disposal, you should have no trouble finding your dream condo in no time at all.




Categories: Condo   Condo Living  


Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 7/10/2017

Fantastic Condo at Greenwood Village is a Commuters Dream! Just Minutes from Route 495, 24 and the Park n Ride Commuter Bus to Boston. This Bright End Unit has New Carpets, an Eat-In Kitchen with Recessed Lights, Wood Ceiling, Upgraded Cabinets and Open to the Freshly Painted Living Room with Vaulted Ceilings and Sky Lights. In Unit Laundry Room with Storage. The Large Bedroom is Located on the Second Floor with a Full Wall of Closet Space. Full Bath has Tub/ Shower and New Tile Floor. Loft/ Office is Open to the Living Room Below with Sliders to Deck which is Perfect for Relaxing or Having Friends and Family over for a Barbecue. Showings will start at the Open House on Sunday July 16 from 12 noon - 3 pm.

This is a Townhouse style home and features 4 total rooms, 1 full bath, 1 bedroom, and is currently available for $229,000.

For complete details click here.




Categories: Real Estate For Sale   Condo