Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 11/19/2019

Photo by Sussi Hj via Shutterstock

Your home is on the market, but you still live there. Now your agent called to see if a potential buyer can look at it in an hour. What do you do?

You Don’t Need to Panic

Instead of holding your head in despair, grab some tools, and clean the most visible areas of your home.

  • Sweep the front porch, steps and any cobwebs lurking in the corners. This is the first place your buyer sees, so it gives them an impression they’ll carry into the rest of the house.
  • While you’re at it, use the broom to give the front door a once over. If you have a cloth handy, use that too. If your door is glass, remove smudges from the kids and dogs. You can use vinegar and water, glass cleaner or simply warm water.
  • Grab a laundry basket and clear clutter from your entryway. Grab stray boots and shoes, hats and coats, school bags and anything else that gets dropped there. Put the basket in your car. You can organize it where it belongs later. Pick up any mail too and stick it in a drawer.
  • Sweep your kitchen floor and run a damp mop over it in the high traffic areas. To simplify this for the future, invest in a mop with a bottle of cleaner attached — no need for buckets.
  • Light a candle or diffuse essential oils in the kitchen to remove any odors from last night’s dinner.
  • Replace all the towels in the kitchen and baths. Set aside towels just for this purpose so that you always have a clean, matching set.
  • While you’re in the bathrooms, run a damp paper towel over the faucets and fixtures, wipe out the sink, and run a quick brush around the waterline of the toilet, then flush it.
  • Grab all the trash from your trash cans in the kitchen, bathroom, office, bedrooms, and laundry room. If you have a container in your garage, put it in there. Otherwise, throw it in a nearby dumpster(law permitting). Just because you can’t smell it doesn’t mean your visitor won’t notice.
  • If you have time, take a feather duster to dark, visible surfaces, light fixtures and art frames.

Finally, grab your family and the pets, hop in the car and head to the park. You don’t want to be near your home while the agent is showing it to buyers. When you’re nearby, the folks visiting might not feel free to ask the questions they need to. When they’ve gone, head back home and reach out to your agent for feedback. 




Categories: Seller  


Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 11/19/2019

 Tuesday

MEDFORD – 126 Fern Rd, (4-6), Bungalow, $495,000


 





Tags: Untagged  
Categories: Open Houses  


Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 11/18/2019

 Interested in a career in real estate or perhaps have a real estate license and not using it?

Join us Tuesday, December 10th, 2019 at 6 PM to learn how to make a career in real estate.


 





 




Tags: Real estate   Realtor  
Categories: real estate agent  


Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 11/18/2019

Image by Suphaksorn Thongwongboot from Shutterstock

When relocating to a new home, you’ll need to plan to pack, hire movers, and to change your address with the post office but don’t forget to update your car insurance. If you’re moving to a new state or just to a new zip code, you will have to make some changes to your insurance to ensure you’re covered at your new residence.

Do You Have to Change Your Car Insurance When You Move?

Each state, and sometimes counties and cities, set the requirements for auto insurance coverage. Some states require a higher level of accident coverage, while others may require a coverage lower than what you already have. You need to adjust your policy to suit the demand of the state. If your current coverage meets the requirements, your premiums may still change. 

Decide on an Insurance Provider

As soon as you are confident you will move, contact your insurance company to see if they conduct business in your new state. Ask your insurance agent about the rules of your prospective state and if you need to change your policy. Doing this early gives you enough time to make the necessary adjustments and have them in place for when you move. If the company you use does not operate in your new state, take some time to research your options. 

Insurance costs vary from one carrier to the next because each company emphasizes different factors that might affect your vehicle in your new location. If you need to change your current insurance company, plan to compare prices and policies from at least three different carriers before deciding on which provider you want.

No-Fault Coverage

Some states in the US require car owners to have "no-fault" insurance coverage. No-fault coverage means that a car owner's insurance company covers any loss, medical bill, or funeral expenses caused by a car accident irrespective of whose fault the accident was (yours or the other driver). You have to find out if your new state has such a law so that you can put the required coverage in place.

Insurance Premiums

Insurance companies factor the chances of various events occurring before determining your premium. Relocating to another state might increase or decrease the likelihood of you making a claim due to theft, vandalism, or accidents. If you move from a small town to a larger city, it is likely your payments will increase. 

For more clarification on your car insurance, speak to an agent in your insurance company before the day of the move. Your realtor can recommend the best options for you to choose from in your new location, so add that to your talking points for the next meeting.




Categories: Relocation  


Posted by WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Briarwood Real Estate on 11/15/2019


Photo by Fizkes via Shutterstock

Months of searching, attending open houses, and viewing available homes finally paid off. You’ve found the perfect property in the perfect neighborhood for the perfect price. You’re ready to make an offer. Then, it happens, you get the dreaded call from your agent telling you there are multiple offers on the property. How does that happen?

Reasons for Multiple Offers

Re-marketing. Remember, the listing agent has the legal and fiduciary duty to the seller to seek the highest price possible. Not only does the higher offer pay the agent more, but it also gives the seller more to work with. As the listing nears its expiration, the agent has an incentive to market it more aggressively so that they can earn their commission. That means more open house events, changes to the listing to bring it back into focus even if it’s been on the market for a while, and other marketing tools.

Inventory shifts continuously. That means at any given moment, fewer houses on the market puts the home you want on more buyers’ radars. Even a house they looked past a month ago might interest them today. This is especially true when you use narrow search parameters because everyone else using those parameters sees the exact same homes.

Buyer demographics align. If you chose to wait until the end of summer, or after the holidays for family reasons, the chances are high that a bunch of other folks did as well. If you’re an empty-nester and waited for fall to start looking, so did other buyers in similar life situations. They’ll like the same things about it that you like.

New listings. Buyers that have lost out to multiple offers in the past now know better than to “sleep on it” when they see a new house available that fits their needs. The typical multiple-offer scenario happens within the first two weeks of a listing reaching the market. This is true particularly if the home is priced right, has curb appeal and desired upgrades or renovations in a preferred neighborhood.

Pocket listings. A so-called “pocket listing” is when a seller’s agent knows a home is going on the market but is not yet listed, and it that appeals to certain buyers to whom they give the head’s up. Some pocket “buyers” ask for notification when there’s another offer. Since the listing agent represents this buyer, there’s nothing stopping their agent from helping them present a better offer than yours. Ask your agent to learn if the other offer is from a client of the listing agent since it makes a difference in how you craft a counteroffer. Options include increasing your offer, your agent could reduce their commission, closing without contingencies, etc.

Trust your agent’s advice on preparing a counteroffer and whether submitting a personal letter with the offer is a promising idea. In some cases, it’s about the bottom line; but in others, it’s an emotional decision to sell a home.




Categories: home buying